Doc4Care Knowledge Base

Chiropractor

Chiropractor

A chiropractor is a health care professional who specialises in the treatment of disorders of the bones, muscles and joints with the help of their hands and exercises. They are the practitioners of chiropractic. The General Chiropractic Council (GCC), UK, defines chiropractic as "a health profession concerned with the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mechanical disorders of the musculoskeletal system, and the effects of these disorders on the function of the nervous system and general health".

Chiropractors, thus, are experts in manual therapies i.e. treatments involving the use of hands. In fact, chiropractors employ a variety of techniques, with an emphasis on the manipulation of the spine. They also provide suggestions on diet, exercise, lifestyle and rehabilitation programmes. Some chiropractors can also employ other alternative techniques like acupuncture.

Chiropractic is broadly categorised as complementary and alternative medicine as opposed to conventional western medicine.


Conditions chiropractors treat

Most chiropractors specialise in treating conditions related to the spine, such as lower back or neck. However, some chiropractors also treat several other conditions.

The musculoskeletal conditions chiropractors treat are:

  • Lower back pain
  • Neck pain
  • Shoulder pain
  • Leg pain and sciatica
  • Slipped discs
  • Problems related to hip, knee, ankle and foot joints
  • Problems related to elbow, wrist and hand joints
  • Fibromyalgia


Becoming a chiropractor in the UK

To start practising as a chiropractor, one must be registered with the General Chiropractic Council (GCC). To be eligible to register, one must successfully complete a GCC-recognised degree from any one of the following institutions:

  • Anglo-European College of Chiropractic (AECC) in Bournemouth offering a five-year integrated Masters in  Chiropractic (MChiro)
  • McTimoney College of  Chiropractic in Oxfordshire offering a four and five-year integrated MChiro
  • University of South Wales offering a four-year integrated MChiro

Entry level qualifications may vary but include GCSEs in Maths and English and three A-levels, two of which preferably in sciences, especially biology or biological sciences, or a relevant higher qualification.

Alternatively, one can also do a one-year foundation programme if one does not possess the necessary skills and qualifications to qualify for entry to the MChiro course.

A chiropractor is a health care professional who specialises in the treatment of disorders of the bones, muscles and joints with the help of their hands. They are the practitioners of chiropractic. The General Chiropractic Council (GCC), UK, defines chiropractic as "a health profession concerned with the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mechanical disorders of the musculoskeletal system, and the effects of these disorders on the function of the nervous system and general health".

Chiropractors, thus, are experts in manual therapies i.e. treatments involving the use of hands. In fact, chiropractors employ a variety of techniques, with an emphasis on the manipulation of the spine. They also provide suggestions on diet, exercise, lifestyle and rehabilitation programmes. Some chiropractors can also employ other alternative techniques like acupuncture.

Chiropractic is broadly categorised as complementary and alternative medicine as opposed to conventional western medicine.


Conditions chiropractors treat

Most chiropractors specialise in treating conditions related to the spine, such as lower back or neck. However, some chiropractors also treat several other conditions.

The musculoskeletal conditions chiropractors treat are:

  • Lower back pain
  • Neck pain
  • Shoulder pain
  • Leg pain and sciatica
  • Slipped discs
  • Problems related to hip, knee, ankle and foot joints
  • Problems related to elbow, wrist and hand joints
  • Fibromyalgia

Other conditions that chiropractors treat are:

  • Asthma
  • Allergies
  • Infant colic
  • Headache and migraine
  • High blood pressure
  • Mental health problems such as depression, anxiety and phobias
  • Gastrointestinal disorders


Becoming a chiropractor in the UK

To start practising as a chiropractor, one must be registered with the General Chiropractic Council (GCC). To be eligible to register, one must successfully complete a GCC-recognised degree from any one of the following institutions:

  • Anglo-European College of Chiropractic (AECC) in Bournemouth offering a five-year integrated Masters in  Chiropractic (MChiro)
  • McTimoney College of  Chiropractic in Oxfordshire offering a four and five-year integrated MChiro
  • University of South Wales offering a four-year integrated MChiro

Entry level qualifications may vary but include GCSEs in Maths and English and three A-levels, two of which preferably in sciences, especially biology or biological sciences, or a relevant higher qualification.

Alternatively, one can also do a one-year foundation programme if one does not possess the necessary skills and qualifications to qualify for the MChiro.

Posted on 1 July, 2017